Movie book – Lotr UK http://lotruk.com/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 20:46:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://lotruk.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/icon-2-150x150.png Movie book – Lotr UK http://lotruk.com/ 32 32 It’s That Movie – Globe of Books and Movies https://lotruk.com/its-that-movie-globe-of-books-and-movies/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 14:34:14 +0000 https://lotruk.com/its-that-movie-globe-of-books-and-movies/ Fun and silly ‘Toy Story’ prequel ‘Lightyear’ avoids most derivative pitfalls It’s rare to see a franchise movie these days with the giddy non-essential energy of Lightyear, a Toy Story spin-off that no one asked for or really seems to care about. The film’s highly superfluous character lends it an understated charm, a sort of […]]]>

Fun and silly ‘Toy Story’ prequel ‘Lightyear’ avoids most derivative pitfalls

It’s rare to see a franchise movie these days with the giddy non-essential energy of Lightyear, a Toy Story spin-off that no one asked for or really seems to care about. The film’s highly superfluous character lends it an understated charm, a sort of half-shrugged doodle vibe where truly silly gags and zippy-quippy zingers ricochet with harmless delight throughout a hero’s journey through otherwise generic. How ironic that Buzz Lightyear, famed for his stupidity and delusion, should star in a film so light on his feet and so aware of his own insignificance.

The opening credits justify the film’s very existence in a quick series of explanatory cards. Toy Story’s Andy, it seems, got his Buzz Lightyear action figure in 1995 because it was merchandise from a popular movie that year. “It’s that movie,” proclaims the last card. We are watching a fictional child’s film from another fictional child’s film! IP merchants, take note: Disney just avoided any questions of continuity by cleverly creating a reboot nesting doll.


LIGHT YEAR ★★★ (3/5 stars)
Realized by: Angus Mc Lane
Written by: Jason Headley, Angus MacLane
With : Chris Evans, Keke Palmer, Peter Sohn, James Brolin, Taika Waititi, Dale Soules, Uzo Aduba, Mary McDonald-Lewis, Efren Ramirez, Isiah Whitcock Jr.
Operating time: 105 minutes


Buzz (Chris Evans), of course, is on a space adventure 4.2 light years from Earth, where he and his spaceship full of hibernating colonizers land on a hostile planet. Befitting his swaggering lone wolf status, he recounts the mission diary with impunity, speaking in such a self-aggrandizing manner that his commanding officer, Alisha Hawthorne (Uzo Aduba) plays catchy background music to poke fun at him. But Buzz’s go-it-alone ways leave him and his cargo of off-world dwellers abandoned. The only way to return home is to develop and test experimental fuel to replace the hyperfast crystal he accidentally destroyed.

Due to the time dilation he undergoes with each flight test, Buzz finds himself jumping 4 years into the future while he himself only ages a few minutes. Six decades later, the tests are still failed, Alisha is dead, and Buzz’s only companion is Sox (Peter Sohn), the robot cat Alicia gave him when he started the tests. Worse still: the mysterious villain Zurg (James Brolin) and his robot army threaten to destroy the abandoned outpost unless Buzz can round up a ragtag group of irregular space rangers and stop him.

So begins Buzz’s long personal arc of learning to live in the moment, appreciating the people around you, and not being so obsessed with “finishing the mission” – especially if that means erasing the essence of the reason why one starts a mission in the first place. There’s also a multiverse narrative detour in the sidebar that doesn’t make much sense and makes someone say “I broke time.”

Anyway, boring. Let’s talk about the AI ​​feline that solves crystal fusion, coughs up hairballs with a flamethrower, spits tranquilizer darts, says “bee-boop bee-boop” when plugged into other circuits, and when calculating numbers, turns his head and purrs “meow-meow meow meow.” Or Darby (Dale Soules), an ex-con more concerned with parole violations than killer androids. Or the rookie cadet with the chronically sad eyes. Or Mo Morrison (Taika Waititi), the misfit Zen warrior who reliably delivers sweet laughs because the guy voicing him is friggin’ Taika Waititi.

All you need to know is that space suits have a quick-draw “surrender rope”, you make a sandwich by putting a slice of bread between two slices of meat, harpoon guns are surprisingly effective against high-tech machines, and you can either call a certain weapon MR8-OOM or “Mr. Boom.” A windy summer movie full of delicious distractions, Lightyear knows the best cure for uninspired plots is unexpected absurdity. To infinity and beyond! Or at least until the inevitable sequel.

For a sequel to the prequel and beyond! Pixar’s ‘Lightyear’.


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Movie Book Adaptations Coming to Netflix in 2022 and Beyond https://lotruk.com/movie-book-adaptations-coming-to-netflix-in-2022-and-beyond/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 22:30:20 +0000 https://lotruk.com/movie-book-adaptations-coming-to-netflix-in-2022-and-beyond/ Netflix has had huge success in the past adapting popular works and that trend will continue. We’re here to walk you through many of Netflix’s upcoming book adaptations specifically made into movies slated for release in 2022 or beyond. We last covered Netflix’s upcoming book adaptations in 2019 and there was a lot to cover […]]]>

Netflix has had huge success in the past adapting popular works and that trend will continue. We’re here to walk you through many of Netflix’s upcoming book adaptations specifically made into movies slated for release in 2022 or beyond.

We last covered Netflix’s upcoming book adaptations in 2019 and there was a lot to cover back then, but now it’s gotten ridiculous! We’re just going to talk about book adaptations of confirmed movies and not TV shows (which we’ll cover in a separate article) or just the books Netflix has picked up (we’ll cover that separately too!).

From now on, we’ll be excluding comics in particular (with one notable exception) from this list, as we’ve already covered them in a separate preview article.


Blond

Coming to Netflix: 2022

blonde netflix book adaptation movie

Andrew Dominik’s Blonde has been in the works for a very long time, being adapted from Joyce Carol Oates’ novel about a fictionalized version of the life of Hollywood actress and model, Marilyn Monroe.


The gray man

Coming to Netflix: July 2022

the gray man netflix

Netflix’s big movie of the summer directed by the Russo Brothers is, in fact, based on a novel and pretty iconic too. We are of course referring to the book written by Mark Greaney.

The film, which is slated to hit Netflix on July 22, is one of Netflix’s biggest to date with a budget of $200 million.


Mr. Harrigan’s phone

mr harrigans phone netflix

Ryan Murphy teams up with Jason Blum to adapt this short story from Stephen King. It’s a horror movie set to hit Netflix later in 2022 (likely for Halloween).

It is set to star Donald Sutherland, Jaeden Martell and Joe Tippett and is adapted by John Lee Hancock.


Nimona

nimona

Nimona – Picture: Netflix

Previously in development at 20th Century Fox, this adaptation of Noelle Stevenson’s novel Nimona (which was a webcomic before it was a novel) was apparently lost after the studio behind the title shut down.

Then the news came in early 2022 that Netflix would relaunch the project and release it as an exclusive.

The animated feature, directed by Nick Bruno and Troy Quane, is about a troublemaking young shapeshifter who is the sidekick of supervillain Lord Ballister Blackheart and together work to stop Sir Ambrosius Goldenloin and the Institution of Law. Enforcement and Heroics.


Persuasion

persuasion netflix book adaptation

Set to be a modern adaptation of Jane Austen’s novel Persuasion, this film comes from MRC with Dakota Johnson and Henry Golding playing the roles of Anne Elliot and Mr. Elliot respectively.

It is slated for release in July 2022 and has received a lot of hype.


Astronaut

netflix bohemia astronaut

Adam Sandler will play Jakub in this sci-fi adventure film which adapts the Czech book by Jaroslav Kalfar, bohemian spaceman.

Not expected to hit Netflix until 2023, the film is about an orphan boy who grew up in the Czech countryside and overcomes all odds to become his country’s first astronaut.

Alongside Sandler, Paul Dano, Carey Mulligan and Isabella Rossellini will star.


The killer

netflix killer movie

David Fincher will bring to life this adaptation of Alexis Nolent’s comic book series which is available as a full graphic novel (hence why we can include him in this list) and will star Michael Fassbender and Tilda Swinton.

The plot of the globetrotting film revolves around an assassin who begins to snap as he develops a conscience while hunting his prey and wants to get out.


The wonderful story of Henry Sugar

the wonderful story of henry sugar netflix

One of many Roald Dahl adaptations in the work is a Wes Anderson-directed live-action film that will star Benedict Cumberbatch, Dev Patel, Ralph Fiennes and Ben Kingsley.


ugly

netflix ugly adaptation

McG directs this adaptation of Scott Westerfeld’s novel with writing by Krista Vernoff.

Here’s what you can expect from the film, which wrapped filming in late 2021:

“Set in an Orwellian future in which teenagers undergo surgery on their 16th birthdays to become like fashion models, the story follows Tally Youngblood – an ‘ugly’ teenager forced by the authorities to give up on her transformation until that she infiltrates The Smoke, a community of rebels who choose to maintain their appearance and live outside of normal society.


More Book Adaptations Coming Soon to Netflix

  • 13: The Musical – Coming-of-age adaptation of Robert Horn’s novel about a young boy who moves from New York to a small town in Indiana.
  • A woman’s guide to selling – Romantic comedy adaptation directed by Meg Ryan based on the novel by Sally Franson.
  • In the west, nothing is new – Based on the novel by Erich Maria Remarque and a remake of the 1930 film adapted by Universal Pictures, this is a German-language adaptation coming exclusively to Netflix.
  • Black brother, black brother – An adaptation of the coming-of-age novel by Jewell Parker Rhodes.
  • dark samurai – Action adaptation by Addictive Pictures based on the book by Marc Olden.
  • Caste: the origins of our discontent – Based on the book by Isabel Wilkerson, ARRAY by Ava DuVernay will take care of this adaptation.
  • Dangerous Liaisons – French romance adapted from Choderlos De Laclos and released in July 2022.
  • Dial A for Aunties – Adapted from Dial A for Aunties (Aunties #1) by Jesse Q. Sutanto
  • missing dog – Rob Lowe will headline this family drama. Based on the book by Pauls Toutonghi.
  • Ehrengard – A Danish film adaptation of Karen Blixen’s novel.
  • West exit – Obama’s Higher Ground Productions and the Russo Brothers AGBO are working on a film adaptation of Mohsin Hamid.
  • Family leave – Family comedy based on the book by Amy Krouse Rosenthal starring Jennifer Garner.
  • Happiness for beginners – A romantic comedy adaptation of the Katherine Center novel that will star Ellie Kemper and Luke Grimes.
movies coming to netflix summer 2022 hello goodbye and everything else

Hello, goodbye and everything in between – Picture: Netflix

  • Hello, goodbye and everything else – Adapted from the novel by Jennifer E. Smith, this teen romance flick from ACE Entertainment is about a young couple retracing their relationship before they broke up and headed off to college. Coming in July 2022.
  • High in the clouds – Animated feature film based on Paul McCartney’s book.
  • I’m not your perfect Mexican girl – LatinX adaptation of Erika Sanchez’s book.
  • Ivy & Bean – A children’s adaptation of the illustrated book series by Annie Barrows which plans to have several entries over the years.
  • Lady Chatterley’s Lover – Coming from Sony to Netflix exclusively, this adaptation of DH Lawrence starring Emma Corrin.
  • leave the world behind – Sam Esmail will adapt this mystery novel published by Rumaan Alam for Netflix.
  • Love & Gelato – Directed by Brandon Camp, this new romance film adapts Jenna Evans Welch’s novel. Coming in June 2022.

The Luckiest Girl Alive Netflix

  • The luckiest girl in the world – Starring Mila Kunis, this thriller is adapted from the novel by Jessica Knoll. Knoll will also be involved in the adaptation to writing the screenplay. Expected release in 2022.
  • Matilda – Another Roald Dahl adaptation coming to Netflix in December 2022.
  • Offering to the Storm – Netflix is ​​about to distribute in certain regions this Spanish adaptation of the book by Dolores Redondo.
  • Ball Ground – An adaptation of Michael Powell’s Canyon Dreams: A Basketball Season on the Navajo Nation.
  • Snow Society – A foreign language adaptation of Pablo Vierci’s book that documents the story of Uruguayan Air Force Flight 571 which crashed in the Andes.
  • electrical condition – Previously at Universal, this film is gearing up to adapt the illustrated novel by Simon Stålenhag and plans to move to Netflix.
  • The good nurse – This big-budget movie (around $30 million) will star Eddie Redmayne and Jessica Chastain adapting Charles Graeber’s novel first released in 2013.
  • The magician’s elephant – An animated feature adapting the children’s book by Kate DiCamillo.
  • The Girls of Netherfield – A contemporary update of Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen.
  • pale blue eye – Christian Bale will be the headliner of this adaptation of Louis Bayard’s novel.

the school for good and evil netflix september 2022

  • The School of Good and Evil – Slated for release in September 2022, this fantasy film adapts Soman Chainani’s book franchise.
  • The selection – Kiera Cass’ teen romance novel is in development at Netflix, but its status is unknown.
  • The statistical probability of lightning strike – Another Ace Entertainment adaptation of a novel by Jennifer E. Smith that will star Jameela Jamil and Ben Hardy.
  • wonderment – Adaptation of Emma Donoghue’s novel as a romantic period play.
  • tree horn – Animated adaptation of the book by Florence Parry Heide directed by Ron Howard.
  • true spirit – An adaptation of Jessica Watson’s biography True Spirit: The Aussie Girl who Take on the World.
  • White noise – Considered unsuitable until then, Noah Baumbach will give the best of himself. Based on Dom DeLillo’s 1986 novel.

Did we miss any major book adaptations in the works at Netflix? Let us know in the comments below.


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Audience•ology movie book by entertainment industry expert and futurist Kevin Goetz remains on Amazon’s bestseller list https://lotruk.com/audienceology-movie-book-by-entertainment-industry-expert-and-futurist-kevin-goetz-remains-on-amazons-bestseller-list/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 12:46:00 +0000 https://lotruk.com/audienceology-movie-book-by-entertainment-industry-expert-and-futurist-kevin-goetz-remains-on-amazons-bestseller-list/ LOS ANGELES, April 11, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Audience•ology: How Moviegoers Shape the Movies We Love, a recently released Hollywood memoir and film book written by entertainment research expert Kevin Goetzhas remained on Amazon’s Best Sellers list for four consecutive months since its release in November 2021. Audience•ology by Kevin Goetz Industry insiders, aspiring filmmakers, movie […]]]>

LOS ANGELES, April 11, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Audience•ology: How Moviegoers Shape the Movies We Love, a recently released Hollywood memoir and film book written by entertainment research expert Kevin Goetzhas remained on Amazon’s Best Sellers list for four consecutive months since its release in November 2021.

Industry insiders, aspiring filmmakers, movie buffs, and readers who just love watching movies weighed in, and the reviews are excellent. Producer and former studio head Sony Pictures Amy Pascal summarizes the response to the book by commenting, “Whether you’re sitting behind the camera or in front of it, in film school or in an office on a studio lot, or just facing a screen as a movie buff, Hearing•ology sheds light on how the comments of moviegoers occupy a special place in the final stages of the making of a film. The explanation of how the test selection process works is illustrated with fascinating stories that are the tradition of Hollywood.”

Months before they hit theaters or on streaming services, nearly every studio-backed film is tested with typical viewer audiences who watch early cuts, answer polls that ask for their unfiltered opinions, and participate. to focus groups to discuss what they appreciated the most… or rejected. The author Goetz is the industry’s foremost researcher and his company, Screen Engine/ASI, does the majority of the from hollywood test screenings. From his personal memories and the stories shared by many of the most talented and powerful filmmakers of our time, Hearing•ology reveals what happened on the nights when the test audience of a few hundred regular viewers saw early versions of Titanic, Forrest GumpToy Story, Field of Dreams, Good Will Hunting, Paranormal Activity, Thelma and Louise, La La Land and dozens of others.

Candidly told and filled with tension, emotion and jaw-dropping humor, the book takes readers into the high-stakes world of filmmaking. It offers a glimpse of what those films looked like before they were polished to scintillating perfection. Before they are locked up and delivered to the world. Before they were blockbusters. It’s no wonder that Hearing•ology has become a darling of the Movie Industry and Movie Theory books on Amazon.

“I am delighted to have captured some Hollywood history in the pages of this book,” says Goetz. “My interviews with legendary filmmakers like Cameron Crowe, Ron Howard, Ed Zwickthe late Dick Zanuck, Sherry Lansingand John Goldwin (to name a few) and commemorating the stories they so generously shared, is a highlight of my long career in entertainment research. I intentionally designed the book to be informative yet conversational, an entertaining and fun read for anyone who enjoys the thrill of sitting down and settling in to watch a good movie.”

Audience•ology: How Moviegoers Shape the Movies We Love by Kevin Goetz with Darlene Hayman is now available in hardcover, e-book and audiobook from Amazon.com and major retailers in the US and UK

Learn more about Hearing•ology to https://kevingoetz360.com/audienceology/.

Contact:
Kari Campano
[email protected]
203-223-0756

THE SOURCE Kevin Goetz


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Audience•ology movie book by entertainment industry expert and futurist Kevin Goetz remains on Amazon’s bestseller list https://lotruk.com/audienceology-movie-book-by-entertainment-industry-expert-and-futurist-kevin-goetz-remains-on-amazons-bestseller-list-2/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://lotruk.com/audienceology-movie-book-by-entertainment-industry-expert-and-futurist-kevin-goetz-remains-on-amazons-bestseller-list-2/ LOS ANGELES, April 11, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Audience•ology: How Moviegoers Shape the Movies We Love, a recently released Hollywood memoir and film book written by entertainment research expert Kevin Goetzhas remained on Amazon’s Best Sellers list for four consecutive months since its release in November 2021. Industry insiders, aspiring filmmakers, movie buffs, and readers who […]]]>

LOS ANGELES, April 11, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Audience•ology: How Moviegoers Shape the Movies We Love, a recently released Hollywood memoir and film book written by entertainment research expert Kevin Goetzhas remained on Amazon’s Best Sellers list for four consecutive months since its release in November 2021.

Industry insiders, aspiring filmmakers, movie buffs, and readers who just love watching movies weighed in, and the reviews are excellent. Producer and former studio head Sony Pictures Amy Pascal summarizes the response to the book by commenting, “Whether you’re sitting behind the camera or in front of it, in film school or in an office on a studio lot, or just facing a screen as a movie buff, Hearing•ology sheds light on how the comments of moviegoers occupy a special place in the final stages of the making of a film. The explanation of how the test selection process works is illustrated with fascinating stories that are the tradition of Hollywood.”

Months before they hit theaters or on streaming services, nearly every studio-backed film is tested with typical viewer audiences who watch early cuts, answer polls that ask for their unfiltered opinions, and participate. to focus groups to discuss what they appreciated the most… or rejected. The author Goetz is the industry’s foremost researcher and his company, Screen Engine/ASI, does the majority of the from hollywood test screenings. From his personal memories and the stories shared by many of the most talented and powerful filmmakers of our time, Hearing•ology reveals what happened on the nights when the test audience of a few hundred regular viewers saw early versions of Titanic, Forrest GumpToy Story, Field of Dreams, Good Will Hunting, Paranormal Activity, Thelma and Louise, La La Land and dozens of others.

Candidly told and filled with tension, emotion and jaw-dropping humor, the book takes readers into the high-stakes world of filmmaking. It offers a glimpse of what those films looked like before they were polished to scintillating perfection. Before they are locked up and delivered to the world. Before they were blockbusters. It’s no wonder that Hearing•ology has become a darling of the Movie Industry and Movie Theory books on Amazon.

“I am delighted to have captured some Hollywood history in the pages of this book,” says Goetz. “My interviews with legendary filmmakers like Cameron Crowe, Ron Howard, Ed Zwickthe late Dick Zanuck, Sherry Lansingand John Goldwin (to name a few) and commemorating the stories they so generously shared, is a highlight of my long career in entertainment research. I intentionally designed the book to be informative yet conversational, an entertaining and fun read for anyone who enjoys the thrill of sitting down and settling in to watch a good movie.”

Audience•ology: How Moviegoers Shape the Movies We Love by Kevin Goetz with Darlene Hayman is now available in hardcover, e-book and audiobook from Amazon.com and major retailers in the US and UK

Learn more about Hearing•ology to https://kevingoetz360.com/audienceology/.

Contact:
Kari Campano
333816@email4pr.com
203-223-0756

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Hinds Community College sets up the production of a famous film, the book ‘Hidden Figures’ https://lotruk.com/hinds-community-college-sets-up-the-production-of-a-famous-film-the-book-hidden-figures/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 01:33:23 +0000 https://lotruk.com/hinds-community-college-sets-up-the-production-of-a-famous-film-the-book-hidden-figures/ The Hinds Community College Montage Theater of Dance brings the story of the “Hidden Figures” to the big stage through performed dance. “We take a long time to celebrate our men, but we don’t take a long time to celebrate our women, and these were four brilliant women to talk about and to acknowledge,” the […]]]>

The Hinds Community College Montage Theater of Dance brings the story of the “Hidden Figures” to the big stage through performed dance. “We take a long time to celebrate our men, but we don’t take a long time to celebrate our women, and these were four brilliant women to talk about and to acknowledge,” the director said. Tiffany Jefferson The story was made popular after the release of the 2016 film The story was an enjoyable part of the experience A student, Eriel Paymon, plays the role of “Hidden Figures” Katherine Johnson Certainly a challenge for us to tell the story through dance,” Paymon said. Kanayo Aga said she learned a lot just by playing the role of Mary Jackson. stars, including Christine Darden, who was a mathematician in the book, who weren’t shown in the film and only in the book. Genesis Kelly plays Darden in the production. “A lot of people don’t know her. They just know the three women in ‘Hidden Figures’ and I’m thrilled to have been cast in this role so I can show people, the audience, who Christine Darden is and that she’s a legacy,” Kelly said. . women, to connect to their stories that I cannot relate to. It’s because I never lived that time. These women were strong, and that helped me become a strong black woman playing this role,” said April Sargent, who plays Dorothy Vaughan. A show was held Saturday at Thalia Mara Hall. You can see other performances Wednesday through Friday at 7 p.m. at the Cain-Cochran Center on the Hinds Community College campus.

The Hinds Community College Montage Theater of Dance brings the story of the “Hidden Figures” to the big stage through performed dance.

“We take a long time to celebrate our men, but we don’t take a long time to celebrate our women, and these are four brilliant women to talk about and recognize,” director Tiffany Jefferson said.

The story was made popular after the release of the 2016 film.

Students who participated in the production said learning about the women featured in the story was an enjoyable part of the experience.

A student, Eriel Paymon, plays “Hidden Figures” Katherine Johnson.

“Just trying to figure out who these ladies were, their story and trying to portray them, it was definitely a challenge for us to tell the story through dance,” Paymon said.

Kanayo Aga said she learned a lot just from playing the role of Mary Jackson.

“I really went and tried to study what they went through growing up, and the things it took to really apply while they were working at NASA,” Aga said.

The play even had stars, including Christine Darden, who was a mathematician in the book, who weren’t shown in the movie and only in the book. Genesis Kelly plays Darden in the production.

“A lot of people don’t know her. They just know the three women in ‘Hidden Figures’, and I’m thrilled to have been cast in this role, so I can show people, the audience, who Christine Darden is and that she’s a legacy,” Kelly said.

The students said that being part of this production helped them grow in more ways than just being dancers.

“I learned to connect with these women, to connect with their stories that I can’t relate to. It’s because I never lived in those times. These women were strong, and that made me helped her become a strong black lady by playing that role,” said April Sargent, who plays Dorothy Vaughan.

A show was held Saturday at Thalia Mara Hall. You can see other performances Wednesday through Friday at 7 p.m. at the Cain-Cochran Center on the Hinds Community College campus.


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Who killed Thresh? Differences and theories between movies and books explained https://lotruk.com/who-killed-thresh-differences-and-theories-between-movies-and-books-explained/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 22:20:00 +0000 https://lotruk.com/who-killed-thresh-differences-and-theories-between-movies-and-books-explained/ Thresh died during The Hunger Games, but his death is portrayed differently in the books and movies. Here are the theories surrounding who killed him. While The hunger Games the movies remained relatively consistent with the books, details like Thresh’s death, confusing. With many characters, their deaths came as readers expected, and how they died […]]]>

Thresh died during The Hunger Games, but his death is portrayed differently in the books and movies. Here are the theories surrounding who killed him.

While The hunger Games the movies remained relatively consistent with the books, details like Thresh’s death, confusing. With many characters, their deaths came as readers expected, and how they died was clear. However, in Thresh’s case, the books and the movies seem to tell different stories.

The first installment of The hunger Games The book series was released in 2008, and by 2012 Suzanne Collins had already helped adapt her novel into a movie of the same name. The story follows Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence), a young girl living in a dystopian reality where 24 children are selected each year to participate in a vicious fight to the death known as The hunger Games. Although Katniss manages to survive, other tributes – like Thresh – aren’t so lucky.

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Related: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2’s Key Differences From The Book

Representing District 11, Thresh is the embodiment of strength and power, and because of this he is approached by a tribute group known as the Career Pack. After refusing their offer of an alliance, Thresh is seen as a threat by the Quarries and their leader Cato. He survives the majority The hunger Gamesbefore being killed with only a few tributes remaining, but how he dies is portrayed differently in the books and movies.


To beat

Although the books do not directly reveal the cause of Thresh’s death, Katniss assumes that he was killed by Cato. After Katniss meets him at the Cornucopia, he saves her from Clove and takes Cato’s backpack. When Katniss and Peeta see Thresh’s image appear in the sky during the thunderstorm, they assume Cato must have been chasing him. It would make sense that Cato would not only want his backpack back, but also want revenge for the death of his district partner Clove. Another theory is that Thresh could have been killed by a lightning strike during the thunderstorm. The storm was deliberately created by The hunger Games‘ Gamemakers and it’s plausible that they kill Thresh, knowing that the Hunger Games finale would be more brutal if it was between Katniss, Peeta and Cato.


In the first film, it is implied that Thresh dies during an attack by Mutt. When the game wardens release the Mutts for the first time in the game, the sound of an attack can be heard, before Thresh dies and the cannon sounds. Although the audience doesn’t witness Thresh’s death, there seems to be little room to dispute how he dies. It’s up to Mockingjay: Part 2, where Katniss refers to Thresh as having been killed by Cato. Although this could have been a false assumption, there is reason to assume that Cato was involved. As Thresh’s death was not explicitly shown in the first film, there are theories that the Mutts could have reached and injured Thresh following an attack by Cato, ultimately blaming Cato.


These discrepancies combine with the debate over the timing of Thresh’s death. In the books he ranks fifth behind Foxface, while in the movies he dies after her, ranking 4th. These differences have caused confusion over who killed Thresh and how he died. While Thresh’s death remains a talking point among viewers, it doesn’t distract from his role within the franchise and the overall success of The hunger Games.

Next: The Hunger Games Prequel Introduced Katniss’ Grandmother – Theory Explained

Rambo Creator David Morrell Hated Last Blood

Why Rambo’s creator hated Last Blood



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Best of 2021: Anthrax’s Scott Ian Chooses Favorite Album, Movie, Book & TV of the Year https://lotruk.com/best-of-2021-anthraxs-scott-ian-chooses-favorite-album-movie-book-tv-of-the-year/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 15:05:00 +0000 https://lotruk.com/best-of-2021-anthraxs-scott-ian-chooses-favorite-album-movie-book-tv-of-the-year/ Get vinyl and Anthrax products including an exclusivity Revolver Spring issue bundle with a limited edition Anthrax shirt with original illustrations by Charlie Benante – at Revolver‘s shop. 2021 has undoubtedly been one of the most memorable years in the history of modern music. The invisible elephant in the room was obviously COVID-19, which triggered […]]]>

Get vinyl and Anthrax products including an exclusivity Revolver Spring issue bundle with a limited edition Anthrax shirt with original illustrations by Charlie Benante – at Revolver‘s shop.

2021 has undoubtedly been one of the most memorable years in the history of modern music. The invisible elephant in the room was obviously COVID-19, which triggered the unprecedented year-plus blackout on nearly every live show. Fortunately, this spring’s widespread immunization rollout proved effective enough that restrictions were lifted, and in the summer the groups were finally able to take to stages across the country.

While we’re not quite in the ‘post-COVID’ era yet, the sheer joy of feeling the heightened sounds and singular energy of live gatherings large and small – from the sweaty concerts at the Turnstile club and from the loud road shows of Slipknot to the enormous Metallica – led to festivals – was beyond rejuvenation.

Plus, there have also been a bunch of killer albums released this year to keep us entertained between mosh pits. Old-school heavyweights Iron Maiden, Carcass and At the Gates brought the heat, stage directors Mastodon and Gojira upped the ante, Converge and Chelsea Wolfe unleashed a bombshell collaboration and a handful of pioneers in the making. – Spiritbox, Jinjer, Turnstile, Scowl, Portraital of Guilt and more – have taken heavy music to exciting new territories. (See Revolverthe 25 favorite albums of 2021 here.)

As we close the books on 2021, we’re catching up with some of our favorite artists to get their picks for the best of the best from last year. Below, Scott Ian of Anthrax shares his favorite shit: From Mastodon’s astonishing “edifice of melody and pain” to Ted lasso‘s “cuteness” and beyond.

Video of Mr. Bungle "Sudden death" (Official video)

Best Song: “Sudden Death” by Mr. Bungle

Yes, it was released in 2020. And yes, I played on it but so what? This is Mr. Bungle and it is the song that I have listened to the most.

Video of Only Murders in the Building | official trailer

Best TV Shows: Only Murders in the Building, Mare From Easttown, Ted Lasso

Only the murders in the building – Steve Martin and Martin Short in a brilliant dark comedy murder mystery. It’s like they did this show just for my sense of humor. Also, Easttown mare – a brilliant meditation on loss, grief and bad choices, and a murder mystery. Also Ted lasso – a brilliant comedy based on cuteness. It’s smart and uplifting and not a murder mystery… yet.

Best Book: City of Thieves

City of Thieves by David Benioff: winter 1943 Leningrad, a frozen and starving city besieged by the Germans. Two Russian boys are sent on an impossible mission behind enemy lines. The book is from 2008, but I read it in 2021.

Video of TOURNIQUET – MYSTERY (Audio)

Best New Group: Turnstile

Turnstile is definitely not a new band, just new to me. They appeared on my radar at very close range with their new album Glow on. It’s like a happy version of Refused The shape of punk to come. I really like their atmosphere.

Best musical moment

I have two. The first was playing my first gig with Anthrax after being away for 20 months at Rock Fest. Going on stage without knowing when we would play again was a highlight. The second was watching my son’s band Honeybee record their debut album at Studio 606. They worked so hard writing and performing throughout the lockdown, wiped out three years of hard work in one crazy year. Seeing and hearing all of their hard work come to fruition was extremely inspiring.

What excites you the most in 2022?

A few things: a new Motor Sister album [Ian’s side project with Mother Superior’s Jim Wilson] and shows. Recording of a new Anthrax album. Anthrax UK / Europe 40th Anniversary Tour in Autumn. Traveling with my family. Amusing.


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Deck The Hallmark Podcast Release Ultimate Christmas Movie Book https://lotruk.com/deck-the-hallmark-podcast-release-ultimate-christmas-movie-book/ https://lotruk.com/deck-the-hallmark-podcast-release-ultimate-christmas-movie-book/#respond Mon, 25 Oct 2021 23:39:51 +0000 https://lotruk.com/deck-the-hallmark-podcast-release-ultimate-christmas-movie-book/ Fans who enjoy the Hallmark movies should definitely know about the comedic podcast trio, Bran, Panda, and Dan. They make up the Le Poinçon Bridge Podcast. Five days a week, this trio, and often special guests, discuss the latest Hallmark films. They even venture into Lifetime, Netflix and beyond. Now, together with movie critic and […]]]>

Fans who enjoy the Hallmark movies should definitely know about the comedic podcast trio, Bran, Panda, and Dan. They make up the Le Poinçon Bridge Podcast. Five days a week, this trio, and often special guests, discuss the latest Hallmark films. They even venture into Lifetime, Netflix and beyond.

Now, together with movie critic and podcaster Alonso Duralde, they’ve written a brand new Christmas movie book titled, I’ll be home for the Christmas movies. The book comes out Tuesday, October 26.

This is a new “ultra-cool unofficial guide” to the Hallmark Christmas movies. In the book is also a vacation entertainment guide. The combo allows you to create your own festive Hallmark Christmas experience at home. Just like those movies you love.

What is I’ll be home for the Christmas movies On?

According to the official press release shared with Ace TV Shows:

Hosts and best friends Brandon Gray, Daniel ‘Panda’ Pandolph and Daniel Thompson share reviews that will make fans feel like watching these holiday favorites with their best friends, chatting up the warm Christmas feelings and absolutely crazy twists and turns with the same excitement. And through original interviews with film stars and creators such as Tyler Hynes, Jill Wagner, Nikki DeLoach and Ron Oliver, fans will discover inside information about the making of the films and learn answers to questions urgent matters such as: the main characters continue to suffer from amnesia? so much stock brokers and lawyers find themselves in the throes of planning a party? And maybe more importantly, do all of the stories take place in something called the “Kennyverse”? “

There are also ideas on how to throw a Christmas movie themed party, festive holiday recipes inspired by the Hallmark movies, and even a Le Poinçon Bridge Bingo game. Is it fun? Actor and friend of the series, Kristoffer Polaha (Wonder Woman 1984, Date Manual), also wrote the foreword.

Which Hallmark blockbuster movies are they criticizing in this new book? Here is a small list:

  • Christmas in Graceland
  • The Christmas series at Evergreen
  • Christmas train
  • Snow bride
  • A Christmas detour
  • Christmas under envelopes
  • Wreath for christmass
  • The Godwink Christmas Series
  • Return trip to Christmas
  • Nine Christmas Lives
Bran, Dan, Panda, Alonso and actor Krisoffer Polaha kicked off Deck The Hallmark season 4 https://www.instagram.com/p/CVYxWgNvgkI/

Why write a book?

Why the Le Poinçon Bridge do podcasters write a book? According to an exclusive interview with Bran, it was because it would be “fun”. He also called it a “natural next step”. Moreover, they relished the idea of ​​becoming New York Times successful writers.

It seemed like a natural step. The podcast got over a million downloads in one year. They had been the guests of a multitude of television shows, including Hello america, Many times.

So, they called Alonso, a seasoned author, for advice. Duralde had an idea. He suggested creating a guide, filled with excerpts. It could be a guide to help people know what to watch. With their distinct personality and taste for movies, this guide is unlike any other.

Which are I’ll be home for the Christmas movies’ Authors, Bran, Panda, Dan and Alonso?

Saturday, Le Poinçon Bridge podcast has launched its fourth season. Alonso flew to join them, as did Kristoffer Polaha. Over the past three years, the three friends have watched hundreds of movies, and they all shared candid, articulate and often hysterical opinions.

Let’s start with the Le Poinçon Bridge trio, Bran, Panda and Dan. They started this podcast because Bran always loved the Hallmark movies and thought it was a good way to get his friends together and have some fun. Plus, their views on the movies are both hysterical and empowering.

Bran is a Hallmark movie buff. He seems to be the most open to the fantasy, the magic of Christmas and the kisses he describes as “big”. Even if you don’t listen to anything else, its synopsis is still tender. He likes to feel the “Christmas mood” by watching Christmas movies while looking at the dishes. However, he cannot do it now. That’s because he’s writing the synopsis and has to give it his full attention.

Panda loves Hallmark movies. Plus, he’s the guy with the “hottest grip”. He especially enjoys films with seasonal sensations, royal romances and comfortable cabins. However, if things get too boring, he’ll say it the way he sees it.

Finally, there is Dan. He is proud to say that he “despises the Hallmark films”. Listeners know he prefers to be called “Daniel”. It seems his pals like to make him a little more cranky with a nickname. “Grumpy Dan” is always looking for adult conversations, meaningful storylines and other elements that place these films in “true cinematic territory”.

However, if he doesn’t like a movie, he won’t even hold back a bit. And, when he says “woof” on a particularly bad movie, it’s hard not to laugh a little.

As for Alonso, he’s a seasoned and respected film critic who watches and can enjoy the holiday movies Hallmark fans love to watch.

Because personalities and tastes are so diverse, the movie guide is perfect for finding a movie for those who don’t like Christmas movies, or for those who want to feel comfortable in the cabin. Bran says that “if only one person uses the guide, I will be very happy”.

What would make him happy? He would love to see a Christmas movie with his two favorites, Kristoffer Polaha and Nikki DeLoach. Maybe Santa Claus can grant him this wish in 2022?

The Le Poinçon Bridge podcast is available on your podcast app, or through the website. They now also share their podcast in video format. This means that interviews with Daniel Lissing, Tyler Hynes and other stars are now available on their Youtube channel.

The book i will be Home For Christmas Movies is available from bookstores, as well as on Kindle.

Latest posts by Georgia Makitalo (see everything)



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Deck The Hallmark Podcast Release Ultimate Christmas Movie Book https://lotruk.com/deck-the-hallmark-podcast-release-ultimate-christmas-movie-book-2/ Mon, 25 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://lotruk.com/deck-the-hallmark-podcast-release-ultimate-christmas-movie-book-2/ Fans who enjoy the Hallmark movies should definitely know about the comedic podcast trio, Bran, Panda, and Dan. They make up the Le Poinçon Bridge Podcast. Five days a week, this trio, and often special guests, discuss the latest Hallmark films. They even venture into Lifetime, Netflix and beyond. Now, together with movie critic and […]]]>

Fans who enjoy the Hallmark movies should definitely know about the comedic podcast trio, Bran, Panda, and Dan. They make up the Le Poinçon Bridge Podcast. Five days a week, this trio, and often special guests, discuss the latest Hallmark films. They even venture into Lifetime, Netflix and beyond.

Now, together with movie critic and podcaster Alonso Duralde, they’ve written a brand new Christmas movie book titled, I’ll be home for the Christmas movies. The book comes out Tuesday, October 26.

This is a new “super cool unofficial guide” to the Hallmark Christmas movies. In the book is also a vacation entertainment guide. The combo lets you create your own festive Hallmark Christmas experience at home. Just like those movies you love.

What is I’ll be home for the Christmas movies On?

According to the official press release shared with Ace TV Shows:

Hosts and best friends Brandon Gray, Daniel ‘Panda’ Pandolph and Daniel Thompson share reviews that will make fans feel like they are watching these holiday favorites with their best friends, chatting up the warm Christmas feelings and absolutely crazy twists and turns with the same excitement. And through original interviews with stars and film makers such as Tyler Hynes, Jill Wagner, Nikki DeLoach and Ron Oliver, fans will discover inside information about the making of the films and learn answers to questions urgent matters such as: the main characters continue to suffer from amnesia? so much stock brokers and lawyers find themselves in the throes of planning a party? And maybe more importantly, do all of the stories take place in something called the “Kennyverse”? “

There are also ideas on how to throw a Christmas movie themed party, festive holiday recipes inspired by the Hallmark movies, and even a Le Poinçon Bridge Bingo game. How much fun is that? Actor and friend of the series, Kristoffer Polaha (Wonder Woman 1984, Date Manual), also wrote the foreword.

What are some of the Hallmark blockbusters that they critique in this new book? Here is a small list:

  • Christmas in Graceland
  • The Christmas series at Evergreen
  • Christmas train
  • snow bride
  • A Christmas detour
  • Christmas under the envelopes
  • Wreath for christmass
  • The Godwink Christmas Series
  • Return trip to Christmas
  • Nine Christmas Lives
Bran, Dan, Panda, Alonso and actor Krisoffer Polaha kicked off Deck The Hallmark season 4 https://www.instagram.com/p/CVYxWgNvgkI/

Why write a book?

Why the Le Poinçon Bridge do podcasters write a book? According to an exclusive interview with Bran, it was because it would be “fun”. He also called it a “natural next step”. Moreover, they relished the idea of ​​becoming New York Times successful writers.

It seemed like a natural step. The podcast got over a million downloads in one year. They had been the guests of a multitude of television shows, including Hello america, Many times.

So, they called Alonso, a senior author, for advice. Duralde had an idea. He suggested creating a guide, filled with excerpts. It could be a guide to help people know what to watch. With their distinct personality and taste for movies, this guide is unlike any other.

Which are I’ll be home for the Christmas movies’ Authors, Bran, Panda, Dan and Alonso?

Saturday, Le Poinçon Bridge podcast has launched its fourth season. Alonso flew to join them, as did Kristoffer Polaha. Over the past three years, the three friends have watched hundreds of movies, and they all shared candid, articulate and often hysterical opinions.

Let’s start with the Le Poinçon Bridge trio, Bran, Panda and Dan. They started this podcast because Bran always loved the Hallmark movies and thought it was a good way to get his friends together and have some fun. Plus, their views on the films are both hysterical and empowering.

Bran is a Hallmark movie buff. He seems to be the most open to the fantasy, the magic of Christmas, and the kisses he describes as “big”. Even if you don’t listen to anything else, its synopsis is still tender. He likes to feel the “Christmas mood” by watching Christmas movies while looking at the dishes. However, he cannot do it now. That’s because he’s writing the synopsis and has to give it his full attention.

Panda loves Hallmark movies. Plus, he’s the guy with the “hottest grip”. He especially enjoys films with seasonal sensations, royal romances and comfortable cabins. However, if things get too boring, he’ll say it the way he sees it.

Finally, there is Dan. He is proud to say that he “despises the Hallmark films”. Listeners know he prefers to be called “Daniel”. It seems his pals like to make him a little more cranky with a nickname. “Grumpy Dan” is always on the lookout for grown-up conversations, meaningful storylines and other elements that place these movies into “real movie territory”.

However, if he doesn’t like a movie, he won’t even hold back a bit. And, when he says “wow” on a particularly bad movie, it’s hard not to laugh a little. It’s not that he’s attacking Hallmark films. What he really hates are thin storylines, immature dialogue, and the actors who call him out.

As for Alonso, he’s a seasoned and respected film critic who watches and can enjoy the holiday movies Hallmark fans love to watch.

Could Le Poinçon Bridge Is the podcast the reason for Hallmark’s changes?

One question, longtime listeners of the Le Poinçon Bridge podcast may question whether or not the trio affected some of the script changes on the show. Real romcoms with catchy dialogue like its correspondent Where Mingle in the Mediterranean never happened during the Bill Abbott era.

As for the whimsical The baker’s son, this kind of scenario did not exist for many years on the well-being channel either. In addition, does the Le Poinçon Bridge do guys help improve the quality of movies on hallmark? There are several reasons to believe this is true.

Since launching his podcast over three years ago, the network has become more open to fantasy and humor. While the “old-fashioned” Hallmark movie still exists, now there are fresher and funer movies that venture into “real movie” territory.

As for the new book, it’s a delight and a true reflection of the entertaining podcast. It’s because the personalities and tastes are so varied that the guide is perfect for finding a movie for those who don’t like Christmas movies, or for those who want to feel comfortable in the cabin. Bran says that “if only one person uses the guide, I will be very happy. “

What would make him happy? He would love to see a Christmas movie with his two favorites, Kristoffer Polaha and Nikki DeLoach. Polaha is a friend of the show and a frequent guest. Nikki is damn amazing.

Maybe Santa can make this wish come true to Bran in 2022?

the Le Poinçon Bridge podcast is available on your podcast app, or through the website. They now also share their podcast in video format. Additionally, this means that interviews with Daniel Lissing, Tyler Hynes and other stars are now available on their Youtube channel.

The book i will be Home For Christmas Movies is available from bookstores, as well as on Kindle.

Latest articles by Georgia Makitalo (see everything)



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IT Movie, Book Differences Explained https://lotruk.com/it-movie-book-differences-explained/ https://lotruk.com/it-movie-book-differences-explained/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 13:12:48 +0000 https://lotruk.com/?p=103 Spoilers follow if you haven’t seen IT yet. Stephen King‘s classic horror novel “IT” totals roughly 1,138 pages and covers 27 years of history in Derry, Maine, more or less. The doorstop of a book follows a group of friends known as the Losers Club both as kids in the 1950s and adults in the 1980s. […]]]>

Spoilers follow if you haven’t seen IT yet.

Stephen King‘s classic horror novel “IT” totals roughly 1,138 pages and covers 27 years of history in Derry, Maine, more or less. The doorstop of a book follows a group of friends known as the Losers Club both as kids in the 1950s and adults in the 1980s. In each decade, they band together to take on the fearsome foe referenced in the title. The story is brutal, unforgiving, envelope-pushing, and completely engrossing.

Andy Muschietti‘s live-action take on IT captures much of the magic and mayhem laid down in the pages of King’s original story, but since it’s truly an adaptation and not a translation, some changes were made along the way. Enough departures from the source material exist to encourage discussions about which version is better for years to come, especially since some changes were made for the better while others, arguably, were missteps.

it-book-cover

Image via Viking Press

Plenty of things from King’s acclaimed novel made their way into the movie. Nearly everything about Georgie, from the brand of wax his brother Bill used to seal his boat to his bloody, severed arm, was a direct translation. The same could be said for Henry Bowers’ sadism, Ben’s fondness for the Derry library, and Eddie taking a stand against his overbearing mother, along with the finer details found throughout. (Like a couple of turtle references for the King faithful).

The biggest change? The setting. Derry, Maine was still the location but setting the story in the 1980s rather than the 1950s drastically changed the design, lingo, and pop culture references. We’ve yet to see how this temporal shift will affect the follow-up film, IT: Chapter Two, but clearly the sequel story will be set in the 21st century. In other words, expect more changes in the future; for now, we’ll stick with what we know.

Most of the changes concern the Losers Club, a.k.a. Bill Denbrough (Jaeden Lieberher), big-boned Ben Hanscom (Jeremy Ray Taylor), comedian-in-training Richie Tozier (Finn Wolfhard), neatnik Stan Uris (Wyatt Oleff), the historian hard-working Mike Hanlon (Chosen Jacobs), hypochondriac Eddie Kaspbrak (Jack Dylan Grazer) and tomboy Beverly Marsh (Sophia Lillis). I’ll start by addressing them one by one before moving into other changes the film has made from the book:


Beverly Marsh

Beverly gets a much-needed overhaul in the movie, which vastly improves on King’s arguably one-note depiction of the character in the book. Bev is still treated as the subject of both sexual attraction and abuse from just about every male character on screen, but she also suffers at the hands of her school’s “mean girls” early on in the picture. That’s a subtle but interesting wrinkle added to her character in the film and one that actually helps to flesh out Bev as a real, live person with her own struggles.

Bev also deals with the specific pressures of adolescence that only women have to handle. Themes of womanhood, sexuality, and puberty were always strong in the book, but Bev’s character gets a whole new exploration of these coming-of-age struggles in the film. There’s honestly enough thought given to this arc throughout the film to support a full-on feminist critique just dealing with Beverly’s role and portrayal. (Someone more versed in literary feminist critique than I am, please, I implore you, write a criticism from this perspective.)

But it’s not all great for Beverly when it comes to the movie’s changes: Despite retaining her fearless, heroic actions from the book (she saved the boys a number of times thanks to her marksmanship skills with a slingshot) she winds up being a “damsel in distress” captured by It in order to lure the boys into It’s lair where they save her, of course. Her catatonic, floating state does, however, give us a glimpse of It’s “dead lights”, one of the more mystical and celestial descriptions from the book.

Interestingly, the movie turns the sexual advances from Beverly’s widower father way, way up. In the book, Alvin Marsh is abusive, usually for strange reasons “because he cares about Beverly” (he cares a lot) but he’s also shown as appropriately affectionate at times; he also dies of mysterious causes well after the first encounter with It. In the movie, however, Beverly takes her father’s life in self defense when he attempts to sexually and physically assault her. This is a bold stance, but one that makes sense within the movie’s context since Beverly, who could honestly be considered the film’s co-protagonist since her arc is among the strongest, has a violent entry into womanhood, one that comes with confidence of being freed from the fear that plagued her throughout the rest of the film.

Mike Hanlon

it-chosen-jacobs

While Beverly gets a much-needed character expansion from book to movie, Mike gets the short straw. In the books, Mike talks to his father—who is dying of cancer—about his past experiences in the military and in Derry. It’s from his father that he learns much of Derry’s history and obtains old photographs as records to corroborate those stories. It’s also through his father’s stories that he first learns of the ancient evil known as It.

In the movie, Mike’s parents died in a house fire which he barely escaped; the memory of the event still haunts him. Clearly this is a change from the book. Even Mike’s relationship with his grandfather is now altered. Rather than a nurturing, mentor-like experience, Mike gets more of a tough-love lesson about the real world; you’re either the butcher or the cattle, basically. All well and good for sucking it up and getting the job done, but not very useful in figuring out the nature of It.

Mike was the local history buff in the book, but the movie shifts this trait to Ben. Also in the book, Mike encountered It while investigating the ruins of the exploded Kitchener Ironworks where It takes the guise of a giant bird. This last part was wisely left out of the movie’s adaptation since it was always rather silly, and the decision to have Mike’s burned parents haunt him throughout the film was a much more effective one.

Unfortunately, the racial tension between the Bowers family and the Hanlon family was pretty much absent in the movie. This family feud went back at least one generation in the books, though it fell to the younger Bowers and Hanlon to carry on as both kids … and likely as adults. (Perhaps this will come into play in the sequel, possibly when we learn more about the house fire since Henry, curiously, comments on it when taunting Mike in the movie.)

Another change was Mike’s weapon of choice. Instead of the Losers bringing a slingshot to battle It–which Beverly wields in the book, armed with silver slugs crafted by Ben–Mike brings the slaughterhouse’s captive bolt pistol to use against It instead. Interesting change and the best use of the weaponized tool since No Country for Old Men.

Ben Hanscom

it-jeremy-ray-taylor

Oh, Ben. I’m delighted that Muschietti and casting director Rich Delia did such a fantastic job at choosing the young actors for the Losers Club and the Bowers Gang. They easily could have aged up the characters (despite the book’s clear descriptions) or shied away from their physical characteristics, but I’m happy to say they did not.

That’s not to say all personality traits survived the adaptation process. Ben was obsessed with the Derry library in the book, but more for architectural and structural reasons than the books it contained. The fact that it offered sanctuary from bullies, however, was pretty consistent in both versions.

In the book, it’s Ben’s engineering aptitude helps the Losers build a dam in the Barrens as well as their impressive underground hideout. The things he’s able to build seem to appear before his eyes as if fully formed while they are too complex for the rest of his Loser friends to grasp. Since the movie pretty much abandoned any craft-making or fort-building–more on that later–Ben’s book strengths would have been largely useless, necessitating the change to a bookish historian. (Sorry, Mike.)

As for the interactions with It, Ben’s first run-in with the title terror in the book was at the town’s canal. He watched as one of the infamous red balloons floated toward him against the wind. Distracted, he was quite surprised to find that Pennywise the Dancing Clown had transformed into a mummy and had nearly dragged Ben down into the frozen water. This mummy is only referenced briefly in the film, but at least the scene is a nod to the original source of fear for Ben.

Eddie Kaspbrak

Eddie’s hypochondriac nature and rapid run-downs of possible perils and side-effects throughout the movie were a delight. The decision to make him the group’s medic, however, was a strange one considering he’d probably have an aversion to blood. His familiarity with Keene’s pharmacy made sense though considering that he has been picking up his asthma medication here for as long as he can remember.

It’s here that another change from the book occurs. Though Eddie eventually learns that his asthma medication is a placebo, in the book it’s actually the pharmacist Mr. Keene himself (likely under the sway of It at the time) who tells Eddie the truth, not a classmate. The revelation was meant to shake Eddie up a bit and make him distrust authority figures more than before, but in the movie, it’s just an excuse for a mean girl to pick on the boy and write LOSER on his cast. (Speaking of that, wouldn’t it have been sweeter if someone else in the group had changed LOSER to LOVER, and not Eddie himself? Oh well.) Either way, the event actually encourages Eddie to stand up for himself and shut down his overbearing mother.

But speaking of that cast, Henry Bowers and his gang actually broke Eddie’s arm in the book, while it’s a fall in the Neibolt House that does it in the movie. The change certainly raises the stakes as far as the danger posed by It is concerned, but the book does a real number on the reader by making the very personal violence between the kids visceral and disturbing. Still, not a bad way to include the “bad break” for Eddie, which may be revisited in the future…

As for It, Eddie’s encounter with the leper at the House on Neibolt Street is terrifying but decidedly less sexually tinted than the one in the books. There the leper offered to “blow” him for a dime, a nickel, and eventually for free. Too strong, even an R-rated cut of It, apparently.

Stanley Uris

it-stanley-uris-wyatt-oleff

In both the book and the movie, Stanley was always the character that felt the thinnest for me. He’s supposed to be the group’s most skeptical member, a fastidious kid whose only other distinguishing characteristic seems to be that he’s Jewish. This is enough for the Bowers Gang to pick on him, of course.

Unfortunately, one of Stanley’s two most defining moments from the book was given to Bill in the movie. Despite his skepticism, it’s actually Stan who uses the shard of a broken glass bottle to cut the Losers’ palms for their blood oath, not Bill. (We’ll have to wait until the sequel to find out if his other memorable moment is kept intact.)

In the book, Stan’s hobby is bird-watching, which sounds pretty quaint and in no way useful when it comes to fighting fear itself, but it actually helps the Losers Club out in a number of ways in the book. This is dropped completely in the movie, probably for good reason. (“Birds in horror” only ever really worked for Hitchcock.)

Stan’s encounter with It in the book had nothing to do with his bar mitzvah or a twisted woman playing the flute. Instead, it took place at the Derry Standpipe, a sort of tower capping the town’s water supply. In the book, Stan became trapped here with the “dead ones”, walking corpses of those who had disappeared over the years. Stan managed to escape thanks in part to his love of birds (don’t ask). The Standpipe is briefly seen in the movie, however, and the floating “dead ones” may be referenced by the spiral of corpses found in It’s lair at the movie’s end.

Richie Tozier

it-movie-image-finn-wolfhard-richie

Richie has long been the group’s jokester, always quick with a one-liner and rarely short on words. Wolfhard’s portrayal of Richie was spot-on in the movie, though some of the character’s finer points didn’t carry over from the book.

Most of those changes revolve around Richie’s encounters with It. In the movie, he’s the last one to see It when Pennywise takes over the slide projector and bursts through the wall in terrifying fashion. In the book, however, Richie notices that the pictures are moving in Bill’s family photo album when he sees Georgie smile at him. This is one of those moments that the kids, collectively and frustratingly, keep to themselves until it becomes clear to each of them in turn that they’re not just seeing things and every one of their friends has also encountered Pennywise in various forms.

The things Richie sees in the book are among the strangest shapes that It takes on. That Paul Bunyan statue shown in the movie? Yeah, it came to life and chased Richie in the book. Richie also fears the titular creature from “I Was a Teenage Werewolf” which chases him and Bill outside of the house on Neibolt Street. So, now Pennywise’s brief transformation into a wolfman creature makes a bit more sense, huh?

Bill Denbrough

it-movie-image-jaeden-lieberher

The ostensible, de factor leader of the Losers Club, Bill is quite capable in both the book and the movie, despite his obvious stutter. I’m thrilled that they kept that aspect of the character in the movie even though it wasn’t quite as big of a point of frustration for Bill as it was in the books. (“He thrusts his fists against the posts and still insists he sees the ghosts.” I love that they included this, though it probably confused some casual viewers.)

Bill’s focus in the movie is on finding his brother, dead or alive. An interesting addition here was Bill using his dad’s blueprints (and his hamster’s extensive tube setup) to recreate the Derry sewer system; nice touch, though it would have been cool to see Bill working on that project with one of the other Losers. In the books, however, he’s well aware that Georgie is dead and, instead, focuses his efforts on surviving the summer with his friends.

One of the tools that keeps Bill safely out of the clutches of It (for a while) is Silver, his trusty, rusty bicycle. The bike has an epic mythology built up around it in the book but it’s left to a couple quick reference shots and a one-liner in the movie. It’s okay, Silver, I’m sure Bill will take care of you for (27) years to come.

While in the movie, Bill ends up wielding Mike’s captive bolt pistol to put an end to It, in the book, he packed his own father’s PPK .380 pistol. Perhaps a real gun in the hand of the movie’s 11-year-old hero was too much for the studio to sign off on, but Bill was more than willing to take up arms when he needed to. What’s strange is that, in the book, he didn’t really need to resort to physical violence. The other mythology not glimpsed in the movie is Bill’s involvement in the so-called “Ritual of Chūd”, which allows him to temporarily defeat It through a sort of psychic battle of wills, no guns involved. Only “mind bullets.” 

Henry Bowers

Henry Bowers’ over-the-top sadism in the movie was, believe it or not, a bit toned down from his behavior in the book. Henry’s realistic violence is often more terrifying than the other-worldly “fear magic” conjured by Pennywise since it hits much closer to home. The movie leaves the explanation of Henry’s anger issues up to subtext with the exception of a scene between him and his father; that’s really all you need to get the point across, but King’s writing lays out generations’ worth of abuse and the rage cycle it encourages.

In the book, Henry’s dad Oscar “Butch” Bowers is a military veteran who was relieved of his duties. His long feud with William Hanlon and his family included such notable events as Butch killing William’s chickens and painting a Swastika on his property, for which Butch had to sell his beloved car to pay for the damages. The feud temporarily stopped when William held Butch at gunpoint and stood his ground. Psychotic and abusive, Butch Bowers’ violent and racist tendencies were passed onto his son, who took out his own rage on the Losers Club.

Henry terrorizes the Losers throughout both stories, but it’s their final confrontation (at least as far as their childhood selves are concerned) that gets a change in the movie. In the book, Henry leads his remaining bully pals into the sewers after the Losers, rather than going it alone. He manages to survive and escape, but goes insane and is committed to an asylum. (I’ll explain why below.) The movie leaves it ambiguous whether or not Henry survives his final fight with Mike, so we’ll have to wait until the sequel to see how that all shakes out.

Bowers’ Gang

Let’s take a look at Bowers’ boys to see how they changed from the book to the movie:

Victor Criss (Logan Thompson) is the smartest of Bowers’ crew, but he almost joins up with the Losers in the book. Unfortunately, he sides with Bowers and tracks the Losers through the sewers where he is soon beheaded by It in the form of a Frankenstein’s monster. (Yep.) Wisely, this was changed for the movie; Victor basically acts as one of Henry’s lackeys throughout and doesn’t get much of an opportunity to distinguish himself.

Belch Huggins (Jake Sim) also heads into the sewers with Bowers in the book and, despite attacking It, is killed by the rarely seen tactic of severe facial mutilation. (It, the entity, also takes the form of Victor and Belch at other points in the book to torment and manipulate Henry.) In the movie, Belch also tags along with Henry, but he’s the one friend who pulls up a bit short once the Bowers boy starts carving into Ben’s stomach.

Patrick Hockstetter (Owen Teague) is far more twisted in the books: He has a refrigerator out in a junkyard where he traps small, injured animals and keeps them there until they die; he keeps a pencil box full of dead flies in school to show people; oh, and he murdered his infant brother by suffocating him. Yeah. (Patrick also gives Henry a handjob when they’re alone and offers to give him a blowjob, as well, for whatever that’s worth.) He’s killed by It when a swarm of flying leeches burst from the refrigerator, drain his blood, and drag him away. So even though he meets his end in the sewers in the film, it’s off-screen, far less gruesome, and much less deserving than his book version.

Derry, ME

Picturesque Derry, Maine looks pretty much like you’d expect in the books once you take the 1980s aesthetic into account rather than a 1950s vibe. Personally, I wish the movie would have spent a little more time letting the town itself breathe and feel like a lived-in space rather than simply hopping from location to location, but this is nitpicking. (It may be more important to do so in the sequel, however…) So let’s take a look at some of those locations to see how they changed from book to movie:

The House on Neibolt Street:

While its rundown appearance is pulled right from the book (and readers’ imaginations), it’s even more of a house of horrors in the movie than it was in the novel. The book version featured the Leper chasing Eddie and the Werewolf coming after Bill and Richie, but the movie chose to pile a bunch of various scares in this house for an extended sequence that saw It splitting up the Losers. There’s a lot that goes down in this scene and Muschietti makes the most of it.

Later on in the book, the house is also the place where the Losers see It retreating into the sewers, but their actual entrance to It’s domain is through a pumping station in the Barrens. The movie, however, sees the Losers lowering themselves down after It into an old well in the basement of the house just before their final confrontation.

it-movie-book-differences

Image via New Line Cinema

The Barrens:

This area plays much more of a role in the book than it does in the movie. The film shows the kids playing in the quarry, but the book spends a lot of time in the town’s tract of land that contains Derry’s landfill, a gravel pit, and sewer-pumping stations, since it acts as a sort of overflow area for the town’s water supply. (Not really the best place to play, as the kids are told early on.)

Also in the book, the Losers dam up the water here and make an underground hideout that keeps them save from the town bullies, thanks to Ben’s engineering skills. This hideout also brings them closer together as friends and helps to give them insight into It’s nature and potential weaknesses. The movie avoids the hallucination scenes (wisely) and leaves It’s more celestial origin story off the screen. Will the sequel explore it? We’ll have to wait and see.

The Sewers:

In the movie, as I mentioned above, the Losers enter It’s domain through an extraordinarily deep well in the basement of Neibolt House. In the books, however, the plot heads back to the Barrens before the Losers all went into the maze of sewer pipes together. (Yeah, there was no “damsel in distress saved by a kiss” in the book, at least not in the kids’ story. Perhaps Muschietti is setting up a parallel for the sequel, however.) Since the movie spent little time in the Barrens to begin with, it’s not surprising that the plot didn’t take them there to enter the sewer system.

The sewer pipes in the book also descend to impossible levels as the Losers try to pick their way through them. It’s lair isn’t some co-opted pump room but something else entirely, something deeper and more foreign than anything the Losers had ever seen before. That could have been an interesting wrinkle to add to the movie–along with It’s true form–but hopefully they’re saving it for the sequel.

But back to the sewers. This rather disgusting location is also the place that the book’s most controversial scene takes place. After surviving It but getting lost in the maze of pipes, Beverly engages in an orgy with all of the other boys. Intended by King as a way to strengthen their bonds and “clear their heads” in order to find their way out, this was wisely cut from the movie adaptation.

Did I miss any big changes from the book to the movie? Be sure to let me know in the comments!

it-book-movie-differences

Image via New Line Cinema


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